International Women’s Day 3/8/18

Soon International Women’s Day will be upon us.  Time to start blogging and showcasing amazing female artists who inspire me.  I first ran into her work on a trip to the UK.  Lucie Rie fled Nazi Vienna in 1938 for London.  Read this amazing article on Lucie Rei at craft and culture’s blog.  Not only a pioneer in ceramics but a courageous woman who fled Vienna as it could be toxic for a young woman in the arts.  She was direct and would not be silenced, self-confident but did not grandstand.  Her sense of objects of beauty surrounding your world  was a design conscious standard in her work.  She was born March 16 1902.

About Pâte de Verre

Pâte de Verre is French for paste of glass. This term originated in France at the end of the 19th Century to describe a technique of glass discovered by Egyptians and possible influences from China and their purple and blue hard glazes. The Egyptian’s developed a sintered-quartz ceramic that was glazed by firing. Later they developed a harder more crystalline compound called Egyptian blue harder than it’s more porous faience counter part. While the true origin is unknown scientific laboratories are researching the influence the Egyptians used to make artifacts for the Pharaohs.

 

Archeologists from France came across Egyptian Blue and were intrigued by the glass and the iconic use of their research from the tombs of pharaohs. It peaked the interest of ceramists in the industry such as Henri Cros (b1840 – d1907). Cros had an interest in experimentation and his love of getting painterly effects lead his to a life of sculpting and glass making. During the Art Nouveau period glassing making for vessels and sculptures were being rediscovered and refined. All glass casting in a kiln was termed pâte de verre but in modern times it’s be redefined by methods of Hot Casting vs. Kiln Casting.

 

Modern pâte de verre uses methods of sintered (a tack fuse), high temperature firings to create different looks. From single to multi-part molds you can use plaster-silica, ceramic fiber, press molded, drip molded using sculpted models in wax or clay.

 

To get the polychrome colors various frits and powders are used with a glue binder (CMC, Gum Arabic, Aloe Vera). Glass colors employ various colorants, which can cause reactions. Glass manufacturers publish which color interacts with another color so you can use or avoid the reaction. Lots of glass secrecy fell away in modern times with the understanding for the chemistry of glass. It is my reason for teaching so this art form is not lost in history again and new artists push the boundaries of what’s possible.

Sintered Method a second method

Rather then using a plaster silica mold and talc as an inner core, this method uses a ceramic fiber mold and no inner core.  This creates a sugar crystal effect on the outside of the piece and a shiny texture on the inside of the piece.

“Mars” (c) Artglassconcepts.com

Pâte de Verre is French for “paste of glass:. This term originated in France at the end of the 19th Century to describe a technique of glass discovered by Egyptians and possible influences from China and their purple and blue hard glazes. The Egyptian’s developed a sintered-quartz ceramic that was glazed by firing. Later they developed a harder more crystalline compound called Egyptian blue harder than it’s more porous faience counter part. While the true origin is unknown scientific laboratories are researching the influence the Egyptians used to make artifacts for the Pharaohs.

 

Archeologists from France came across Egyptian Blue and were intrigued by the glass and the iconic use of their research from the tombs of pharaohs. It peaked the interest of ceramists in the industry such as Henri Cros (b1840 – d1907). Cros had an interest in experimentation and his love of getting painterly effects lead him to a life of sculpting and glass making. During the Art Nouveau period glassing making for vessels and sculptures were being rediscovered and refined. All glass casting in a kiln was termed pâte de verre but in modern times it’s be redefined by methods of Hot Casting (ladle poured) vs. Kiln Casting.

 

Modern pâte de verre uses a sintered  method (a tack fuse), or high temperature firings to create different looks. From single to multi-part molds you can use plaster-silica, ceramic fiber, press molded, drip molded using sculpted models in wax or clay.

 

To get the polychrome colors various frits and powders are used with a glue binder (CMC, Gum Arabic, Aloe Vera). Glass colors employ various colorants, which can cause reactions. Glass manufacturers publish which color interacts with another color so you can use or avoid the reaction. Lots of glass secrecy fell away in modern times with the understanding for the chemistry of glass. It is my reason for teaching so this art form is not lost in history again and new artists push the boundaries of what’s possible.

Botanicals

I’ve been in absentia for far to long with to many arms in the fire.  But at last

(c) Delores Taylor 2017
(c) Delores Taylor 2017

_DSC9141-2 _DSC9142

What I’m working on

Papillio palinurus
Papillio palinurus

I get to hang out occasionally with a water color artist and illustrator who is a member of the American Society of Botanical Artists  https://www.asba-art.org and the Pacific Northwest Botanical Artists  https://www.pnba and Kathleen’s work is posted this month in http://www.pnba-artists.com.  I recently joined this organization to have my drawings inform my sculpture.  My next project is a butterfly and red flower.  More posts once I have drawn my specimen onto paper.  I love how the photographer Andrew Lageras captured the butterfly with direct and indirect lighting shows both the blue and green coloration of this species under light and shadow.  I will have a specimen of this butterfly to study for the drawing so there might be variations to the final piece.

 I found this on Datura’s Blog I love this Deepak quote:
If you obsess over whether you are making the right decision, you are basically assuming that the universe will reward you for one thing and punish you for another.
The universe has no fixed agenda.  Once you make any decision, it works around that decision.  There is no right or wrong, only a series of possibilities that shift with each thought, feeling, and action that you experience.
If this sounds too mystical, refer again to the body.  Every significant vital sign – body temperature, heart rate, oxygen consumption, hormone level, brain activity, and so on – alters the moment you decide to do anything; decisions are signals telling your body, mind, and environment to move in a certain direction.

—Deepak Chopra, The Book of Secrets: Unlocking the Hidden Dimensions of Your Life (via quotes-shape-us)

(via parkstepp)